Weekly Write: “Stroke” by Robin Scofield

Stroke

The last night he was marked
as a whole self, Jackie spent drinking,
smoking, and looking splendid.

But within the body, an occult signifier—
a bolt of electricity—arced across his brain,
and no one could sense the cerebral infarction.

They were out drinking as usual. He slurred
his words as usual, releasing the usual
university 101 liberal arts professor repartée

while mute blood vessels in his right
brain hollowed. The empty spaces struck
him down as though a lion

had stroked his cheek. One half of his face
stricken. His sleep was stuporous.
Neither thrombosis in the Circle of Willis

nor vascular constriction was visible,
but the lack of signal stood out the next morning
when he tried to stand up and hit the floor instead.

The half-self left to him he could not bear.
Stage left lost in his tangled neurons.
What signs he painted on his body

that last day, I have no right to know.
He died on Yom Kippur, his final atonement.
With his good right hand, he wanted to unseal

all vessels and veins to picture his defeat
on the wall that must be painted over
one too many times.

Robin Scofield, author of Flow (Street of Trees Projects), winner of the Southwest Book Award from the Border Regional Library Association, has poems appearing in Ponder Review, The Main Street Rag, and Mocking Heart Review. She writes with the Tumblewords Project in El Paso and attends the San Miguel Poetry Week.

 

 

 

“Like”, “Share”, and comment on this poem to nominate it for the Annual Swimming with Elephants Publications 2020 Anthology.

Click here check out the 2019 Anthology:  Trumpet Call; a Swimming with Elephants Anthology available for only $12.95.

Weekly Write: “Elegy for My Brother-in-Law” by Robin Scofield

Elegy for My Brother-in-Law

Your baby learned to wave bye-bye at lunch today;
of course, he doesn’t know what it means as he giggles
in his yogurt the day your left ventricle seized,
and you fell as you were by the kitchen sink
where you left your lighter. You left my sister,
your 13 month-old son, and another in the womb.
Your six-year relationship ends here with her holding
your hand after they pronounce you dead before
you finished falling. Your cousin Eileen is six.
She’s had her share: little brother run over by a van,
and her mother almost died after bariatric surgery.
Your baby could learn a lot about bye-bye from her.
Greg, your mother collapsed sobbing:
Oh Gregory what have you done
Oh Gregory what have you done
and more in her liturgical Hungarian.
Your father died the same way at the same age, 48.
I’m going to be a different dad this time around,
you said, the day before when you hoisted the baby
in your arms or put him on your knee as you played
piano and wrote a letter to your teenage daughter.

Robin Scofield, author of Flow (Street of Trees Projects), winner of the Southwest Book Award from the Border Regional Library Association, has poems appearing in Ponder Review, The Main Street Rag, and Mocking Heart Review. She writes with the Tumblewords Project in El Paso and attends the San Miguel Poetry Week.

 

 

 

“Like”, “Share”, and comment on this poem to nominate it for the Annual Swimming with Elephants Publications 2020 Anthology.

Click here check out the 2019 Anthology:  Trumpet Call; a Swimming with Elephants Anthology available for only $12.95.